• 1580 Creekside Dr. Suite 220 Folsom, CA 95630
  • (916) 983-4444 Make an appointment

Peptic Ulcer Disease


Treatment for peptic ulcers depends on the cause. Usually treatment will involve killing the H. pylori bacterium, if present, eliminating or reducing use of aspirin and similar pain medications, if possible, and helping your ulcer to heal with medication.

Medications can include:


  • Antibiotic medications to kill H. pylori. If H. pylori is found in your digestive tract, your doctor may recommend a combination of antibiotics to kill the bacterium. These may include amoxicillin (Amoxil), clarithromycin (Biaxin), metronidazole (Flagyl), tinidazole (Tindamax), tetracycline (Tetracycline HCL) and levofloxacin (Levaquin).

  • The antibiotics used will be determined by where you live and current antibiotic resistance rates.You'll likely need to take antibiotics for two weeks, as well as additional medications to reduce stomach acid, including a proton pump inhibitor and possibly bismuth subsalicylate (Pepto-Bismol).

  • Medications that block acid production and promote healing. Proton pump inhibitors — also called PPIs — reduce stomach acid by blocking the action of the parts of cells that produce acid. These drugs include the prescription and over-the-counter medications omeprazole (Prilosec), lansoprazole (Prevacid), rabeprazole (Aciphex), esomeprazole (Nexium) and pantoprazole (Protonix).

  • Long-term use of proton pump inhibitors, particularly at high doses, may increase your risk of hip, wrist and spine fracture. Ask your doctor whether a calcium supplement may reduce this risk.

  • Medications to reduce acid production. Acid blockers — also called histamine (H-2) blockers — reduce the amount of stomach acid released into your digestive tract, which relieves ulcer pain and encourages healing.


Available by prescription or over-the-counter, acid blockers include the medications ranitidine (Zantac),famotidine (Pepcid), cimetidine (Tagamet HB) and nizatidine (Axid AR).


  • Antacids that neutralize stomach acid. Your doctor may include an antacid in your drug regimen. Antacids neutralize existing stomach acid and can provide rapid pain relief. Side effects can include constipation or diarrhea, depending on the main ingredients.

  • Antacids can provide symptom relief, but generally aren't used to heal your ulcer.

  • Medications that protect the lining of your stomach and small intestine. In some cases, your doctor may prescribe medications called cytoprotective agents that help protect the tissues that line your stomach and small intestine.

  • Options include the prescription medications sucralfate (Carafate) and misoprostol (Cytotec).


1580 Creekside Dr. Suite 220 Folsom, CA 95630
(916) 983-4444

     

Schedule: Monday-Friday
8:30 AM to 12:00 PM, 1:00 PM to 5:00 PM
Physician available 24 hours a day, 24/7, 365 days

© 2017-2018  Gastroenterology Medical Clinic